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Estimates Briefing Book 2016-17


Table of contents

Mandate

Ministry contribution to priorities and results

Ministry programs and activities

Table 1: ministry planned expenditures 2016-17 ($m)

Ministry organization chart

Agencies, boards and commissions (abcs)

Detailed financial information

Appendix: 2015-16 annual report

Table 3: ministry interim actual expenditures 2014-15


Ministry overview

Mandate

The Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade (MCIIT), which serves three ministers (Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade, Minister Responsible for Women's Issues, and Minister Responsible for Seniors’ Affairs), has lead responsibility for immigration and newcomer settlement, international trade and representation, voluntary and not-for-profit sector, provincial honours and awards, women’s issues, and seniors’ affairs.

The Ministry works in partnership with other provincial ministries, other levels of government, the public, and the private and not-for-profit sectors to develop and implement policies and programs that:

  • Maximize the benefits of immigration for newcomers and Ontario by attracting highly skilled workers to help meet Ontario’s labour market needs and supporting the successful social and economic integration of immigrants and refugees;
  • Promote and recognize greater social inclusion, civic and community engagement, and volunteerism;
  • Support the creation of jobs by promoting Ontario as a premier location to do business, and by increasing exports and attracting Foreign Direct Investment (FDI);
  • Build a society free of violence against women and increase women’s economic security;
  • Improve the quality of life for Ontario’s seniors by helping them live safely, independently and with dignity in their communities; and
  • Provide accessible, inclusive and respectful service to Ontario’s diverse communities.

Ministry contribution to priorities and results

The Ministry’s programs directly support the key government priorities of “Increased Talent and Skills Among Ontarians,” “Supportive and Dynamic Business Environment,” “Reduced Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion,” and “Strengthened Public Safety and Security” by improving the economic and social outcomes of newcomers, women and seniors, increasing the competitiveness of employers, strengthening the capacity of the not-for-profit sector, strengthening Ontario’s economy and innovation agenda, and increasing safety and security for women and seniors. 

The Ministry is organized according to the following program areas:

Immigration:

Through the implementation of the Immigration Strategy, the Ministry is supporting Ontario’s economic growth and prosperity by: attracting highly skilled workers and their families; supporting diverse communities; and growing a globally connected economy.  The Strategy sets a new direction for how we select, welcome and help immigrants to our province.  It provides a framework to engage with partners and develop more coordinated services to better serve the changing needs of Ontario’s immigrants.

Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program – Nominates strong economic immigrants to help meet Ontario’s labour market needs, increase economic immigration to the province, attract investment and support job creation.

Labour Market Integration Program Delivers a range of workplace and foreign qualification recognition support services to help highly skilled immigrants succeed in the labour market. This includes Ontario Bridge Training Programs, Global Experience Ontario and implementation of the Fair Access to Regulated Professions and Compulsory Trades Act.

Settlement and Integration Program – Addresses key gaps in immigrant and refugee outcomes by providing access to comprehensive settlement services that help newcomers overcome integration barriers. Services are delivered through the Newcomer Settlement, Refugee Resettlement and Municipal Immigration Online Programs.

Language Training – Provides English and French as a Second Language training from basic to advanced levels to help learners gain the language skills they need to successfully work and live in Ontario.

Citizenship:

Citizenship programs support jobs and economic growth through partnering with the private and not-for-profit sectors and promoting greater social inclusion, civic and community engagement, and recognition.

Ontario’s Voluntary Sector and Not-for-Profit Sector Program – Strengthens and facilitates the not-for-profit sector and encourages and supports volunteerism in Ontario. Both sectors provide a public benefit by advocating for vulnerable populations.

Honours and Awards Secretariat – Delivers honours and awards programs that recognize the outstanding achievements and contributions of Ontarians for their service to the community. The Secretariat also organizes special commemorative events on behalf of the Province of Ontario.

New measurements have been developed for immigration and citizenship programs in the past fiscal year, which will be monitored and refined to ensure that measures and targets are meaningful and relevant.

Ontario150

Leads the development and delivery of a cross-government, multi-faceted program to commemorate and celebrate the sesquicentennial of Ontario and Canada in 2017 and leave a legacy for future growth and prosperity.

International Trade & Representation:

This program supports economic growth and job creation in Ontario by: promoting Ontario as a world class provider of goods and services; increasing Ontario’s trade by providing assistance to Ontario firms to begin exporting or to expand into new markets; and by leveraging Ontario’s 11 International Trade and Investment Centres and by attracting FDI.

Exporters Skills Development

  • Seminars/Webinars/Workshops/E-Programs: 1st Steps to Exporting; NAFTA/Customs Compliance, New Exporters to Border States missions (30th year) and others.
  • One-on-one market consulting: To develop a market business strategy.

Outbound Trade Missions to Priority Markets/Sectors

  • Trade missions/ Exhibitions/Virtual missions: Over 80 missions to priority international markets.

Inbound Missions

  • Incoming buyer programs for international delegations: Organize business to business (B2B) meetings with Ontario suppliers and site visits.
  • Global Export Forums (region focused): Recruit global buyers to Ontario to meet suppliers (organize B2B meetings and site visits).

Advocacy initiatives: Advocate on behalf of clients with foreign buyers and decision-makers.

Support SME’s through International Representation:

  • In-Market Trade Development Representatives (ITDRs): Deliver in-market business development services for exporters (located in the Gulf Cooperation Council, Southeast Asia, Mexico, Chile and Brazil).
  • Ontario’s International Trade & Investment Offices: Co-located in Canadian embassies in 11 global cities, focus on foreign direct investment, science and tech collaboration and exports.  They provide on the ground support to Ontario exporters in their market.

Women’s Issues – Ontario Women’s Directorate:

The Ontario Women's Directorate (OWD) promotes women’s equality with a focus on ending violence against women, increasing women’s economic security and supporting women’s leadership.  Ending violence against women and closing the economic gap for women requires multi-pronged, sustained strategies involving a wide range of stakeholders.  OWD priorities are achieved through:

  • Implementing It’s Never Okay: An Action Plan to Stop Sexual Violence and Harassment;
  • Building partnerships and leading cross ministry initiatives (e.g., Long-Term Strategy to End Violence Against Indigenous Women, Human Trafficking Strategy and Women in Business initiatives) to prevent violence against women and increase women’s economic security;
  • Engaging stakeholders to identify and analyze emerging issues and working with ministries to address those concerns; and
  • Providing grants for innovative initiatives that support best practices in fostering women’s safety and economic security.

Seniors’ Affairs - Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat:

The Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat (OSS) develops policies and delivers programs to meet the needs of seniors to help them lead active, healthy and dignified lives and undertakes public education efforts for and about Ontario seniors.  The OSS also offers advice and support to other ministries on policies and programs that impact seniors. 

Seniors Friendly Communities – Oversees Elderly Persons Centres (EPCs) which provide social and recreation programs for seniors and administers the Elderly Persons Centres Act; provides Seniors Community Grants to not-for-profit community groups for projects to encourage greater social inclusion and volunteerism; promotes Age-Friendly Communities; provides information through public education to support healthy aging; recognizes seniors’ contributions; and improves access to information about programs and services available to seniors, including supporting Active Living Fairs across the province, Seniors’ Month (June) activities and a range of print and online resources. 

Safety and Security – Implementation of the Retirement Homes Act, 2010 and oversight of the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority; ongoing delivery and strengthening of Ontario’s elder abuse strategy; and ongoing implementation and oversight of the Finding Your Way wandering prevention program.  

Ministry Programs

The tables below illustrate the Ministry’s key program commitments and expected results for 2016-17 that align with key government priorities.

“Increased Talent and Skills Among Ontarians”

MCIIT’s Key Commitments for 2016-17

  • Deliver Ontario’s Bridge Training programs to help skilled immigrants get licensed or find employment at a level commensurate with skills and experience.
  • Work with the federal government to maximize the benefits of immigration and seek greater input on immigration selection, including greater flexibility and an expansion of the Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program.
  • Deliver the Adult Non-Credit ESL/FSL Program to help approximately 70,000 learners each year acquire the language skills they need to live in Ontario and succeed in the labour market.  
  • Continue, through Global Experience Ontario, to develop tools to assist pre- and post-arrival internationally-trained individuals so that they have accurate information about working in non-health regulated professions and in the trades. 
  • Support the Office of the Fairness Commissioner in monitoring regulatory bodies’ obligations to provide fair access for internationally-trained individuals to regulated professions and trades.

Expected Results

  • Immigrants find employment commensurate with their skills and experience which bring employment rates of skilled recent and very recent immigrants into line with Canadian born and trained professionals.
  • International students are retained through the Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program.
  • Improved acquisition of official language skills.
  • Immigrants can access qualification recognition pathways.

“Supportive and Dynamic Business Environment”

  • Attract a highly skilled workforce and build a stronger economy by:
    • Continuing to strengthen the Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) to support employers in attracting and retaining the skilled workers they need for today’s knowledge-based economy;
    • Working to raise employer awareness of the skills and experience of Ontario’s high skilled immigrant talent and the potential that talent offers to increase Ontario’s competitive advantage in emerging global markets; 
    • Supporting the Not-for-Profit (NFP) sector through the Partnership Grant Program (PGP), NFP section on Ontario.ca (Ontario.ca/notforpprofits), and continuing efforts to invigorate Ontario’s tradition of volunteering; and
    • Leading the implementation and launch of Ontario’s first Volunteer Action Plan to strengthen Ontario’s volunteer base by working in equal partnership with the Not-for-Profit (NFP) and corporate sectors to promote the value of, and reduce barriers to volunteerism.
  • Strengthen Ontario’s Global Footprint through Ontario’s international representatives, which act as business ambassadors for the Province, to project Ontario on the world stage, provide expertise and connections to facilitate new economic partnerships, and contribute to the Province’s trade and investment by:
    • Operating Ontario’s 11 high profile international offices;
    • Administering the economic partnerships established with other jurisdictions; and
    • Organizing/supporting Premier’s and Minister’s international missions as well as Ontario business delegations to and from global markets. 
      • Assist Ontario companies in exporting their products and services to key markets worldwide and to attract FDI by:
        • Increasing the number of new exporters and encouraging market diversification;
        • Enabling successful new exporters through exporter skills development programs;
        • Assisting clients to secure and expand market share in target markets through trade programs and services that are client driven and cost effective;
        • Identifying new market opportunities for Ontario exporters; and
        • Advancing export transactions and projects through in-market advocacy.
      • Make SMEs aware of the benefits of exporting and encourage them to take advantage of the range of government programs available by:
        • Running two Domestic Marketing Campaigns targeted at new and non-exporters and medium intensity exporters through a variety of traditional and new media channels.
      • Leverage the global connections of our diverse communities by:
        • Developing a Global Connections Strategy to leverage Ontario’s diversity to ensure better international trade and investment opportunities.
      • Develop regulations under the Ontario Immigration Act.

Expected Results

  • OINP nominates individuals whose skills are needed by Ontario employers.
  • Increased capacity of Ontario businesses to export successfully to emerging global markets by tapping into the global skills, knowledge and experience of Ontario’s high skilled immigrants.
  • A stronger, more effective and responsive partnership between the government of Ontario and the private, not-for-profit and voluntary sectors.
  • Increased awareness of immigration and export support services among immigrant entrepreneurs.
  • Enhanced collaboration with ethnic and cultural chambers, business councils, business and cultural leaders, and experienced exporters.
  • Increased export activity by Ontario’s SMEs due to domestic marketing campaigns.
  • Promoted quality goods and services from Ontario SMEs by connecting them with international buyers, attracting foreign direct investors to Ontario and fostering international partnerships with Ontario research and innovation organizations. 
  • Ontario firms begin to export or expand into new export markets to support the province’s broader economic strategy to increase jobs and prosperity for Ontarians. 

“Reduced Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion”

  • Continue to implement Ontario’s Refugee Resettlement Plan to support the arrival and successful settlement and integration of refugees.      
  • Invest in programs and services that support the successful settlement and integration of newcomers through programs such as the Newcomer Settlement Program and Language Interpreter Services Program.
  • Increase the online capacity, resources and information provided to immigrants by municipalities through the Municipal Immigration Information Online Program (MIIO), which provides newcomers with pre- and post-arrival information (including regarding employment services) on where and how best to settle in Ontario, as well as on how to prepare to move to a particular municipality.
  • Promote seniors’ engagement, inclusion, and active and healthy aging by:
    • Building on the services and information provided by EPCs which are governed by the Elderly Persons Centres Act as a result of a mandated program review;
    • Continuing to deliver the Seniors Community Grant Program; and
    • Supporting Age-Friendly Communities (AFC) through an AFC Planning Grant Program, and related AFC Outreach Initiative.
  • Continue to provide critical and timely information for diverse seniors through Active Living Fairs, Seniors’ Month activities and through a range of resources.
  • Promote women’s economic security by supporting:
    • Training programs for low-income women to enter into higher paying jobs;
    • Micro-lending programs to help low-income women start their own business-employment;
    • Convening a Steering Committee that would work to promote the increased representation of women in business, including on boards and in senior executive roles in corporations; and
    • Working with the Ministry of Labour to support the development of the provincial Gender Wage Gap Strategy.

    Expected Results

  • Successfully welcome, settle and integrate refugees to Ontario.
  • Improved settlement and integration outcomes: reduction in poverty rates, improved social integration and labour market performance.
  • Improved access to community services through the provision of interpreter services to victims of domestic and sexual violence who have language barriers.
  • Seniors community inclusion supported by identifying and expanding opportunities for seniors to engage, volunteer, and learn.
  • Continued identification of issues relevant to seniors and development of policies that help improve the quality of life of Ontario’s seniors. 
  • Increased participation of women in the economy and business, including participation of women in non-traditional professions and in leadership positions.
  • Gender Wage Gap Steering Committee used to inform a strategy to close the gender wage gap.

“Strengthened Public Safety and Security”

  • Continue to lead the implementation of the Sexual Violence and Harrassment Action Plan by:
    • Continuing to raise awareness about sexual violence and harassment;
    • Enhancing training and resources;
    • Increasing support and develop an enhanced prosecution model; and
    • Creating a safer environment.
  • Co-lead the implementation of the Long-Term Strategy to End Violence Against Indigenous Women by:
    • Reviewing existing programs with other ministries;
    • Co-leading the development of the human trafficking strategy;
    • Supporting the implementation of the Canada-wide prevention and awareness campaign currently being developed;
    • Providing funding for existing Indigenous-led public education campaigns, including expanding Kizhaay Anishinaabe Niin – I am a Kind Man;
    • Supporting better research on the prevalence of violence against Indigenous women; and
    • Working with ministries to apply an Indigenous gender lens to policies and programs.
  • Continue to work collaboratively with Indigenous partners and federal, provincial and territorial governments to address the issue of violence against Indigenous women by:
    • Supporting the national inquiry on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls; and
    • Supporting actions and outcomes from the National Roundtable on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.
  • Co-lead (with the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services) a comprehensive strategy to end human trafficking in Ontario. The Strategy would be survivor-focused and focus on the identification, prevention and intervention of human trafficking in Ontario, while ensuring that it respects specific cultural needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities.
  • Promote seniors’ safety and security by:
    • Overseeing the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority, and developing policy, legislation and regulations related to the Retirement Homes Act, 2010, including the five-year statutory review;
    • Continuing to deliver and strengthen Ontario’s Strategy to Combat Elder Abuse based on the review conducted in 2015; and
    • Supporting and overseeing the Finding Your Way wandering prevention program which provides information and resources related to living safely with dementia for seniors, caregivers and community.

Expected Results

  • More effective supports for women who are victims of sexual violence and harassment. 
  • Increased awareness of the root causes of violence against Indigenous women and enhanced supports for Indigenous women experiencing violence and their families.
  • Strengthened relationships with Indigenous organizations and communities.
  • Successful development of a human trafficking strategy in collaboration with the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services.
  • Increased awareness of seniors’ safety and enhanced security for vulnerable seniors.

Other Priorities

  • Lead the development and delivery, with Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport as a primary partner, of a multi-faceted program to commemorate and celebrate the sesquicentennial of Ontario and Canada in 2017.
Expected Results
  • Ontarians across the province have opportunities to participate in sesquicentennial events, programs and activities.
  • Communities come together to celebrate, take pride in their achievements, and showcase their creativity and cultural diversity.
  • Youth are engaged, inspired and empowered as tomorrow’s leaders. 
  • All Ontarians benefit from strong economic, social and cultural legacies.

Table 1:  Ministry Planned Expenditures 2015-16 ($M)

Operating 220.8
Capital 0.0
TOTAL 220.8

Highlights of 2015-16 achievements

MCIIT continued to deliver results that support the government’s key priorities.  Highlights of these results include:

  • Supporting the passage of Ontario’s first ever Ontario Immigration Act (Bill 49), which formally recognizes the important role of immigration and the expansion of Ontario’s Immigrant Nominee Program to help meet the Province’s future labour market needs;
  • Participating in eight international trade missions and organizing more than 45 international minister-led missions;
  • Continuing to implement a range of initiatives under the government’s new Action Plan to Stop Sexual Violence and Harassment; and
  • Conducting the first review of the Elderly Persons Centres program in 50 years.

Ministry Organization Chart

1. Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade

1.1 Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade - Michael Chan

1.1.1 Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade - Cristina Martins

1.1.2 Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade - Monte Kwinter

1.2 Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues - Tracy MacCharles

1.2.1 Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues - Harinder Malhi

2.1 Deputy Minister - Helen Angus

2.1.1 Executive Assistant to Deputy Minister - Zaynah Jamal (A)

3.1 Ontario Women’s Directorate Assistant Deputy Minister Business

3.1.1 Ontario Women’s Directorate Executive Director - Susan Seaby

3.2 Regional and Corporate Services Division Assistant Deputy Minister/CAO¹ - Cindy Lam

3.2.1 Human Resources Branch Director² - Liborio Campisi

3.2.2 Legal Services Branch Director³ - Fateh Salim

3.2.3 Corporate Resources Branch Director - Tony Marzotto

3.2.4 Regional Services Branch Director - Tom Chrzan

3.3 Syrian Refugee Resettlement Secretariat Assistant Deputy Minister - Melissa Thomson

3.4 Citizenship & Immigration Division Assistant Deputy Minister - Shirley Phillips

3.4.1 Citizenship Branch Director - Rick Beaver

3.4.2 Immigration Policy Branch Director - Alice Young

3.4.3 Immigration Programs Branch Director - Doug Dixon

3.4.4 Business Immigration & Selection Branch Director - Mili New

3.4.5 Ontario 150 Project Executive Director - Michael Langford

3.4.6 Provincial/Territorial Secretariat Director - Stephanie Shatilla

3.4.7 Refugee Resettlement Program Director - Yvonne Ferrer

3.5 International Trade and Representation Division Assistant Deputy Minister - Cameron Sinclair

3.5.1 International Representation Branch Director - Dave Barnes

3.5.2 International Trade Director - Enrico Di Nino

3.5.3 Business Engagement & Outreach Director - Margaret Steeves

3.6 Agency Transformation Assistant Deputy Minister - Mary Shenstone

3.7 Communications Branch Director 4 - Deborah Swain

3.8 Community Services I&IT Cluster CIO/Assistant Deputy Minister 5 - Soussan Tabari

3.8.1 Case and Grant Management Solutions Director - Sanaul Haque

3.8.2 Data Collection and Decision Support Solutions Director - Carm Scarfo (A)

3.8.3 iACCESS Solutions Director - Sanjay Madan

3.8.4 Strategic Planning and Relationship Management Director - Lolita Singh

1 Administratively reports to Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade. Provides servicesto Ministry ofCitizenship, Immigrationand International Trade, Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sportand Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat.

Dual Reporting Relationships:

2 Reports to ADM, Regional and Corporate Services Division,Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and ADM, HRService Delivery, Ministry of Government and Consumer Services.

3 Reports to ADM, Regional and Corporate Services Division, Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and Assistant DeputyAttorney General, Ministry of the Attorney General.

4 Reports to DM, Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and DM, Corporate Communications and Associate Secretary of the Cabinet.

5 Reports to Corporate Chief Information and Information Technology Officer, Treasury Board Secretariat.

Denotes “Acting”


1. Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat Organization Chart

1.1 Minister Responsible for Seniors' Affairs - Mario Sergio

1.2 Deputy Minister Responsible for Seniors’ Affairs - Marie-Lison Fougère

1.2.1 Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister - Patrick Ouellet

2.1 Assistant Deputy Minister Responsible for Seniors’ Affairs - Abby Katz Starr (A)

2.1.1 Strategic Policy & Stakeholder Relations Branch Director - Alan Ernst (A)

2.2 Regional and Corporate Services Division Assistant Deputy Minister/CAO¹ - Cindy Lam

2.2.1 Human Resources Branch Director² - Liborio Campisi

2.2.2 Legal Services Branch Director³ - Fateh Salim

2.2.3 Corporate Resources Branch Director - Tony Marzotto

2.2.4 Regional Services Branch Director - Tom Chrzan

2.3 Communications Branch Director 4 - Deborah Swain

1 Administratively reports to Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade. Provides services to Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade, Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport and Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat.

Dual Reporting Relationships:

2 Reports to ADM, Regional and Corporate Services Division, Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and ADM, HR Service Delivery, Ministry of Government and Consumer Services.

3 Reports to ADM, Regional and Corporate Services Division, Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and Assistant Deputy Attorney General, Ministry of the Attorney General.

4 Reports to DM, Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and DM, Corporate Communications and Associate Secretary of the Cabinet and provides services to Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat.

(A) Denotes “Acting”

Agencies, Boards and Commissions (ABCs)

Ontario Honours Advisory Council:

The Ontario Honours Advisory Council is an advisory body accountable to the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade. It considers nominations for:

  • The Ontario Medal for Police Bravery in recognition of acts of outstanding courage and bravery by police officers while on or off duty. 
  • The Ontario Medal for Firefighter Bravery in recognition of acts of outstanding courage and bravery by firefighters while on or off duty.
  • The Ontario Medal for Young Volunteers in recognition of their outstanding volunteer achievements by youth between the ages of 15 and 24.
  • The Ontario Medal of Good Citizenship in recognition of outstanding long-term efforts and contributions by individuals to the well-being of their communities.

Advisory Council to the Order of Ontario:

The Order of Ontario is the province’s highest official honour. The independent Advisory Council recommends individuals to receive this honour in recognition of their excellence and achievement in Ontario and around the world.

Office of the Fairness Commissioner (OFC):

The OFC is responsible for assessing the registration practices of certain regulated professions and trades. Its purpose is to make sure these practices are transparent, objective, impartial and fair for anyone applying to practice his or her profession, particularly for internationally- trained individuals. 

Ontario Investment and Trade Advisory Council (OITAC):

OITAC was established to provide strategic advice and support to the government on promoting Ontario to the world as a premier location for business investment and business immigration.

Ontario Immigration Investor Corporation (OIIC):

OIIC was established in 1999 to invest the funds received under the federal Immigrant Investor Program (IIP) to support economic development and job creation.  The program was created to provide permanent residency to individuals who meet eligibility criteria and invest a sum for a period of five years which is distributed to participating provinces and territories. The primary obligation of the OIIC is to invest the money from immigrant investors and to return the investment in five years. The IIP was terminated by the federal government in April 2014; as a result, the OIIC will wind down when its repayment obligations are satisfied in 2021-2022.

REGULATORY AUTHORITY

The Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade oversees the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority (RHRA), a regulatory authority created by the Retirement Homes Act, 2010 to administer and enforce the Act and its regulations on behalf of the government.  The Act provides a framework for the regulation of retirement homes and establishes an accountability and governance framework between the Ministry and the RHRA. 

The RHRA is responsible for licensing retirement homes, education of licensees, and conducting inspections, investigations and enforcement activities.  It also handles consumer complaints about retirement homes, provides consumers with information about retirement homes, and maintains a public register of retirement homes.

 

Summary of ABCs' financial Data

Name 2016-17 Expense Estimates 2016-17 Revenue Expense Estimates 2015-16 Expense Estimates Interim Actuals 2015-16 Revenue Interim Actuals 2014-15 Expense Estimates Actuals 2014-15 Revenue Actuals

Office of the Fairness Commissioner

1,795,088 1,799,788 1,685,088 1,719,728 1,720,088 1,868,323

Ontario Immigrant Investor Corporation

8,217,500 16,177,700 10,271,900 20,222,100 14,139,000 25,901,000

Ontario Investment and Trade Advisory Council

N/A - N/A - N/A -

Advisory Council to the Order of Ontario

N/A - N/A - N/A -

Ontario Honours Advisory Council

N/A - N/A - N/A -

Detailed financial information

Table 2: Combined Operating and Capital Summary by Vote

Votes/Programs Estimates
2016-17
$
Change from
Estimates 2015-16
$
% Estimates
2015-16**
$
Interim Actuals
2015-16**
$
Actuals
2014-15**
$
Operating expense
Ministry Administration Program* 24,650,000 (56,200) (0.2) 24,706,200 26,326,607 25,444,915
Citizenship and Immigration Program 171,513,400 45,422,500 36.0 126,090,900 124,267,382 121,950,988
Ontario Women's Directorate 23,226,400 2,725,100 13.3 20,501,300 27,031,669 19,922,059
Ontario Seniors' Secretariat 19,949,400 1,054,900 5.6 18,894,500 19,534,096 17,103,241
International Trade 32,687,300 12,477,800 61.7 20,209,500 20,603,642 16,700,400
Total Operating Expense to be Voted 272,026,500 61,624,100 29.3 210,402,400 217,763,396 201,121,603
Statutory Appropriations 128,028 - - 128,028 128,028 91,617
Ministry Total Operating Expense 272,154,528 61,624,100 29.3 210,530,428 217,891,424 201,213,220
Consolidation & Other Adjustments - School Boards (55,718,000) - - (55,718,000) (51,735,000) (50,715,352)
Consolidation & Other Adjustments - Colleges (2,469,300) 2,259,300 - (4,728,600) (5,214,100) (5,880,463)
Consolidation & Other Adjustments - Ontario Immigrant Investor Corporation 6,789,800 (1,677,600) (19.8) 8,467,400 8,487,300 12,064,049
Total Including Consolidation & Other Adjustments 220,757,028 62,205,800 39.2 158,551,228 169,429,624 156,681,454
Capital expense
Ministry Administration Program 1,000 - - 1,000 - -
Total Capital Expense to be Voted 1,000 - - 1,000 - -
Statutory Appropriations 1,000 - - 1,000 - -
Ministry Total Capital Expense 2,000 - - 2,000 - -
Capital assets
Ministry Administration Program 1,000 - - 1,000 - -
Regional Services Program - (1,000) (100.0) 1,000 - -
Ministry Total Capital Assets 1,000 (1,000) (50.0) 2,000 - -
Ministry Total Operating and Capital Including Consolidation and Other Adjustments (not including Assets) 220,759,028 62,205,800 39.2 158,553,228 169,429,624 156,681,454

*Also provides support to the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport including the Pan/Parapan American Games Secretariat.

**Estimates, Interim Actuals and Actuals for prior fiscal years are re-stated to reflect any changes in ministry organization and/or program structure. Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2015 Ontario Budget.

Appendix: 2015-16 annual report

2015-16 achievements

The tables below illustrate the Ministry’s key strategies and results for the 2015-16 fiscal year.

Increased Talent and Skills Among Ontarians

Key Commitments Results Achieved

Develop strategies to improve and streamline the Foreign Qualification Recognition process.

Deliver Ontario’s Bridge Training programs to help skilled immigrants get licensed or find employment at a level commensurate with skills and experience.
  • Through the Pan-Canadian FQR Working Group, identified improvements to pre-arrival information and uptake to enable prospective immigrants to start the FQR process before arrival in Canada.
  • Since 2003, Ontario Bridge Training projects have targeted more than 100 occupations in order to help almost 50,000 highly skilled immigrants.
  • In 2015-16, over 2,900 bridge training participants obtained employment and 780 achieved licensure in their regulated occupations.
  • The Ontario Bridge Training budget was $26.4 million in 2015-16 of which the Ontario government contributed $21.2M and the federal government contributed $5.2M through a Contribution Agreement with the province to support these programs. Over 6,000 highly skilled immigrants benefitted as a result of this coordinated federal-provincial investment.

Deliver the Adult Non-Credit ESL/FSL Program to help approximately 70,000 learners acquire the language skills they need to live in Ontario and succeed in the labour market.  

  • For the 2015-16 school year, the government invested $61.8 million in tuition-free adult language training that will help about 70,000 immigrants improve their English or French. 
  • A number of enhancements to the Adult Non-Credit Language Training Program have been developed and implemented to address the language training needs of immigrants in Ontario.  These include:
    • Expansion of learner eligibility to allow adult immigrants whose first language is French to access tuition-free English language training;
    • Implementation of a minimum instructor accreditation standard;
    • Ongoing development and delivery of the Coordinated Language Assessment and Referral System (CLARS) to  provide a single-point of access and a consistent approach to language assessment and referral for adult immigrants seeking to access both language training programs; and
    • Provision of Language Training Certificates to confirm proficiency levels of learners enrolled in the Adult Non-Credit Language Training Program.
Through Global Experience Ontario, develop tools to assist pre and post-arrival internationally-trained individuals so that they have accurate information about working in non-health regulated professions and in the trades.  .
  • Provided information about licensure and registration processes in non-health regulated professions and compulsory trades to over 1,500 internationally trained individuals.
  • Delivered training to almost 1,000 front-line settlement and employment workers who work directly with internationally trained individuals, to gain understanding of licensure requirements and pathways to employment in Ontario.

Supportive and Dynamic Business Environment

Key Commitments Results Achieved

Attract a highly skilled workforce and build a stronger economy by:

  • Transforming the Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) which selects strong economic immigrants (i.e., eligible foreign workers, international students and key staff of corporations and entrepreneurs) with potential to contribute to Ontario’s economy. 
  • Continuing to work toward a target of 70% economic immigrants to Ontario.
  • Ontario is now able to nominate 5,200 individuals through Ontario’s Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP). This is up from 2,500 in 2014, and surpasses the 5,000 target that was put forth in the Immigration Strategy.
  • OINP also successfully launched two new Business Streams: the Corporate and the Entrepreneur Streams. These new streams are designed to attract foreign corporations and entrepreneurs (and their new business ideas, talent and investment) to the province.
  • Ontario employers attracted and retained economic immigrants with high levels of human capital. 
  • New federal government is aware of and acknowledges Ontario’s need for increased economic immigration through Minister’s bilateral discussions.
Utilize the Minister’s Employers’ Table to gather information that will help Ontario better support employer immigration needs and identify opportunities to improve the labour market integration of Ontario’s immigrants.
  • Since 2013, the Annual Minister’s Employers Tables have provided the Ministry with the opportunity to engage with Ontario businesses to gain insight on changing local labour market conditions and the immigration selection process.
  • In 2015, the Ministry held a third round of the Minister’s Employers Tables which focused on how to grow Ontario’s export potential and specifically, how Ontario businesses can tap into the global skills of Ontario’s immigrants to improve Ontario’s global competitiveness.

Leverage the global connections of our diverse communities by:

  • Developing a Global Connections Strategy to leverage Ontario’s diversity to ensure better international trade and investment opportunities.
  • Outreach and consultations were conducted with businesses and academic experts to identify pilot projects and other actions to leverage the immigration and trade nexus. This included a “Thought Leaders” Roundtable with business and academic leaders.
  • Pilot projects identified include a potential partnership with Ryerson to use Magnet platform to provide SMEs with market information while connecting these businesses with international talent to support business and trade expansion.

Continue to work toward the target of 5% francophone immigration set out in Ontario’s Immigration Strategy.

  • The Ministry has taken a number of steps to improve Francophone immigration including:
    • Promoting Ontario at Destination Canada, Canada’s main international Francophone immigrant recruitment event, and at Canada Week, hosted by the Embassy of Canada in Paris, France. Participation at Destination Canada was cancelled due to the Paris terror attacks in November 2015;
  • Promoting our nomination program at bilingual universities and colleges in Ontario and Francophone community organizations;
  • Assuming a national leadership role on Francophone immigration issues as the provincial/territorial representative of the new Citizenship and Immigration Canada – Francophone Minority Community Committee;
  • Creating the Group of Experts on Francophone Immigration in June 2015, which will examine how to promote, recruit, welcome, integrate, and retain Francophone immigrants in Ontario and will submit a public report in 2016;
  • Continuing to support the municipal francophone immigration website (http://www.immigrationfrancophone-ontario.ca/ ) with 19 municipal partners, and are engaging with three more municipal partners in the coming year. By working with these municipalities we are supporting Ontario communities to increase Francophone immigration;
  • Continuing to support Francophone organizations to deliver settlement and integration services targeted to Francophone newcomers; and
  • Funding the implementation of a public awareness campaign – Immigrant Francophone Veut Dire: Ensemble pour un Ontario Français Prospère – to foster the development of welcoming communities for Francophone newcomers.

Support the legislative process concerning Bill 49, the Ontario Immigration Act, which provides the regulatory authority and tools to welcome immigrants that will help Ontario meet its future labour market needs.

  • Ontario’s first-ever Immigration Act which helps to maximize the social, cultural and economic benefits of immigration was passed.  The legislation puts in place the tools and authorities needed to welcome the immigrants who meet Ontario’s labour market needs.  The Act also recognizes the importance of Franco-Ontarian communities to the province. 

Develop Ontario’s first Volunteer Strategy to promote volunteerism and civic engagement in the Province, and support a dynamic business environment in the not-for-profit sector.

  • Developing Ontario’s first Volunteer Action Plan (OVAP) which will strengthen Ontario’s volunteer base by working in equal partnership with the Not for Profit (NFP) and corporate sectors to promote the value of volunteerism.    OVAP  is “calling to action” other ministries,  the not-for-profit (NFP) and  corporate sectors to work together to achieve the  following objectives:  improving collaboration, enhancing the volunteer experience, promoting awareness, and supporting research that addresses some of the main barriers facing volunteering, and building on the volunteer legacy of the Pan/Parapan American Games.   
  • The Ministry worked with Ontario Volunteer Centre Network to create a certificate program to recognize the contributions of volunteers.
  • The Ministry worked with FindHelp Information Services to create SparkOntario, an on-line platform that showcases volunteering and helps volunteer-seeking organizations and volunteers connect.

Support the Not-for-Profit (NFP) sector through:

  • Partnership Grant Program (PGP).
  • NFP section on Ontario.ca   (Ontario.ca/notforprofits)
  • Through our 2011-2014 Partnership Grant Program (PGP), the Ministry invested $7.3 million to help 27 organizations carry out projects that strengthen the NFP sector. 
  • Migrated materials developed for NFPs from ServiceOntario to the government’s central website Ontario.ca.

Strengthen Ontario’s Global Footprint through Ontario’s international representatives, which act as business ambassadors for the Province to project Ontario on the world stage, provide expertise and connections to facilitate new economic partnerships, and contribute to the Province’s trade and investment by:

  • Operating Ontario’s 11 high profile International Trade and Investment Offices.
  • Organizing/supporting Premier’s and Minister’s international missions as well as Ontario business delegations to global markets. 
  • Ontario’s International Trade and Investment Offices play an important role in advancing Ontario’s international economic development mandate, supporting economic growth and job creation in Ontario. They raise the profile of Ontario in their respective markets, attract foreign direct investment, facilitate trade and innovation transactions, develop strategic partnerships, and provide commercial intelligence and in-market support for visiting delegations and VIPs from Ontario.  From April 2015 – March 2016, the Ontario International – Trade and Investment Offices assisted more than 460 companies to access export markets, facilitated more than 17 trade transactions, and contributed to 14 won investment deals representing more than 800 jobs created and retained and more than $54 million invested in Ontario.
  • Premier and Minister led missions are part of the government’s plan to boost Ontario’s economy by attracting new investments, facilitating partnerships and helping Ontario businesses export globally.  In 2015-16, the Minister led five international missions, while the International Trade and Representation Division also supported nine missions led by other Ministers.  The Division also provided key support for each of the Premier’s missions throughout 2015-16.

Work with Ontario exporters and international buyers to increase Ontario’s export of goods and services and act as a key provincial resource for global trade promotion by liaising with stakeholders within (and outside of) the Ontario government, and lead by example across many industrial sectors and geographical markets.  This includes:

  • Acting as a catalyst to connect Ontario companies with opportunities in foreign markets through on the ground assistance of the international offices and International Trade and Development Representatives (ITDR) firms in target markets.
  • Increasing the international awareness of Ontario’s quality goods and services.
  • Organizing incoming buyer programs and incoming delegations to Ontario with business-to-business matchmaking with Ontario suppliers. 
  • MCIIT is actively working with Ontario’s SMEs on diversifying its exports to key markets worldwide, including:
    • Brazil, India and China, the Gulf Cooperation Council countries (e.g., the United Arab Emirates), Turkey, Mexico, Chile, Japan, South Korea, Australia and Southeast Asia.
  • Ontario’s Going Global Strategy aims to help companies export to global markets, creating jobs in Ontario.  We assisted new and experienced exporters to prepare for international markets and brought 625 companies on 75 international trade missions to foreign markets.  These companies anticipate $680 million in potential sales, directly attributed to these missions.
  • Ontario’s Trade and Investment Offices abroad promoted quality goods and services from Ontario’s SMEs, connecting them with international buyers and attracting foreign investors to Ontario and fostering international partnerships with Ontario research and innovation organizations. 

Reduced Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion

Key Commitments Results Achieved

Continue to invest in programs and services that support the integration of newcomers through Newcomer Settlement Programs and Language Interpreter Services Program.

Implement Ontario’s Refugee Resettlement Program to expedite the arrival of refugees and support their settlement and integration in Ontario.
  • MCIIT has invested $26.3M over three years (2013-2016) to support the successful settlement and integration of over 80,000 newcomers through the provision of:
    • Comprehensive community-based settlement and integration services delivered by a network of over 95 agencies;
    • Services targeted to vulnerable populations such as high risk newcomer youth, immigrant women and migrant workers;
    • Orientation to Ontario (O2O) workshops designed to provide recent newcomers with access to critical information about life in Ontario; and
    • The International Student Connect Program to support international students to settle and integrate successfully in Ontario. 
  • In September 2015, the government invested $8.5M over 2.5 years to support the implementation of Ontario’s Refugee Resettlement Plan, with a target of welcoming up to 10,000 refugees by the end of 2016.  As a result of the national Syrian Resettlement Plan, this target was reached in February 2016.
  • Key achievements to date include:
    • Expanding refugee-targeted settlement and integration services in Toronto, Ottawa, Hamilton, Kitchener, London and Windsor where over 90% of refugees are settling;
    • Enhancing refugee sponsorship efforts to recruit and train more sponsors and promote civic engagement and fundraising to support refugees;
    • Partnering with the settlement sector to implement a public education campaign to create a more welcoming environment for refugees and train frontline settlement workers on trauma and refugee mental health; and
    • Developing whole of government structures and processes to facilitate the development of informed and coordinated service planning and delivery. 
Connect immigrants and employers through the Municipal Immigration Information Online Program (MIIO), and providing municipalities the opportunity to showcase their communities as a destination by providing local information through municipal portals.  
  • Ministry programs work in partnership with municipal governments by:
    • Helping local employers recruit the skilled workers they need to be competitive, and
    • Supporting local economies by attracting families and international students.
  • Ontario has supported the development of 30 municipal immigration websites through the Municipal Immigration Information Online (MIIO) program, giving an online profile to over 130 communities in the province.

Support training programs that strengthen the leadership skills of Indigenous women.

Over 7,000 Indigenous women have participated in ministry funded leadership development workshops since 2007 and about 300 of them have taken on leadership roles in their communities. 

Promote seniors’ engagement, inclusion, and active and healthy aging by:

  • Supporting and overseeing Elderly Persons Centres (EPCs), including conducting a review of the EPC program; delivering the Seniors Community Grant Program; and supporting Age-Friendly Communities (AFC) through initiatives such as the AFC Planning Grant Program.
  • Developing and providing critical and timely information for diverse seniors through Active Living Fairs, Seniors’ Month activities and a range of resources.
  • Advanced seniors’ engagement, inclusion and healthy/active aging and helped improve the quality of life of Ontario’s seniors by:
    • Conducting the first review of the EPC program in 50 years by engaging with stakeholders through 12 consultation sessions held throughout Ontario in 2015, with a view to strengthening these centres.
    • Providing EPCs with $11.5 million in annual funding for the 263 centres across the province to help them provide a range of social, recreational programs, and also some health, education and support services;
    • Promoting social inclusion and community engagement by providing the Seniors Community Grant Program with $2 million in funding, a two-fold increase from the prior year and funding 544 projects to benefit approximately 116,000 seniors;
    • Supporting Age-Friendly Communities (AFC) by providing $1.5 million in funding for 56 projects that will help local governments and organizations plan for more accessible and inclusive communities; and
    • Healthy and active aging and seniors’ inclusion and community engagement promoted and supported, through increased opportunities for seniors’ engagement, volunteerism, and learning by:
      • Providing $165,000 to the Older Adult Centres Association of Ontario to deliver 61 Senior Information and Active Living Fairs and reaching 15,000 Ontarians; and
      • Continuing to promote Seniors’ Month each June to encourage healthy living and raise awareness of programs and services, including A Guide to Programs and Services for Seniors in Ontario, available in 16 languages.

Promote women’s economic security by supporting:

  • Training programs for low-income women to enter into higher paying jobs.
  • Micro-lending programs to help low-income women start their own business-employment.
  • Initiatives to improve women’s leadership.
  • Initiatives to close the gender wage gap
  • More than 2,400 women have participated in training though the Women and Skilled Trades Information Technology WIST/IT training program.  This program gives low-income women the training they need to get better paying jobs.  From 2014-16, $4.8M is being invested in this program.
  • The Microlending program is providing training to more than 1,460 low-income women in the skills needed to start and run a business.  From 2013-16, $.17M is being invested in this program. 
  • The 2015 Fall Economic Statement stated that the Ontario government is establishing a steering committee that will work to improve the representation of women on boards and in senior executive position.
  • Implemented the “comply or explain” regulation (Ontario was the first Canadian jurisdiction to introduce “comply or explain” regulation in December 2014). Companies listed on the TSX are now required to report publicly on their approach to increase the number of women on their boards and in executive officer positions.
  • The OWD is supporting the Ministry of Labour to develop the Gender Wage Gap Strategy.

Strengthened Public Safety and Security

Key Commitments Results Achieved

Promote seniors’ safety and security by:

  • Overseeing the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority, and policy, legislative and regulatory development related to the Retirement Homes Act, 2010, including a five-year statutory review.
  • Continuing to deliver, and strengthen Ontario’s Strategy to Combat Elder Abuse.
  • Supporting and overseeing the Finding Your Way wandering prevention program.
  • Enhanced safety and security for vulnerable seniors by:
    • Overseeing the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority that has conducted over 2,000 inspections and assisted more than 4,000 Ontarians with questions and concerns last year alone;
    • Conducting a five-year statutory review of the Retirement Homes Act, 2010;
    • Completing a review of Ontario’s Strategy to Combat Elder Abuse with consultation in 6 communities and 180 participants and identifying next steps to strengthen activity within existing resources; and
    • Expanding the Finding Your Way Program to include broader community engagement and education of service providers (targeting emergency medical services, supportive housing and retirement home staff) in wandering prevention activities.

Promote women’s safety by:

  • Continuing to implement a wide range of new initiatives under the government’s new Action Plan to Stop Sexual Violence and Harassment.
  • Supporting public education campaigns and training of professionals to address all forms of gendered violence.
  • Forming a Roundtable to provide ongoing advice to the Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues on issues related to violence against women.
  • Co-leading a Joint Working Group that is developing and implementing initiatives to address the high rates of violence against Indigenous women.
  • Released the award-winning #WhoWillYouHelp campaign which has received more than 85 million views worldwide, raised awareness and shifted attitudes.
  • Passed the Sexual Violence and Harassment Action Plan Act, 2016.  The legislation strengthens provisions related to sexual violence and harassment in the workplace, on campus, in housing, and through in the civil claims process.
  • Hosted It’s Never Okay: 2015 Summit on Sexual Violence and Harassment in the Fall. 
  • Launched the Creative Engagement Fund to support artistic projects that raise awareness and provoke a discussion about challenging issues associated with sexual violence and harassment.
  • Launched an Innovation Fund that will support new and innovative approaches to help survivors of sexual violence and harassment.
  • Invested additional funding in Hospital-based Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Treatment Centres to enhance specialized counselling services and community outreach support for survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence.
  • Stabilized and increased the annual investment for the province’s 42 sexual assault centres so they can enhance their services for survivors of sexual violence.
  • Implemented and updated the Health and Physical Education Curriculum in all publicly-funded schools.
  • Convened a permanent Roundtable on Violence Against Women which is providing advice to the government on issues of gendered violence in Ontario and making Ontario a leader within Canada on issues of violence against women.  The Roundtable has been holding regular meetings since March 2015 and includes representatives from more than 20 organizations.
  • Collaborated with the Joint Working Group to develop and launch, Walking Together, Ontario’s Long-Term Strategy to End Violence Against Indigenous Women.  The initiatives in the strategy will improve the situation for Indigenous women and their families.

Other

Key Commitments Results Achieved

Recognize the contributions Ontarians make to their communities and to the province.

  •  A strong civic society in which volunteers are acknowledged for their service to the community.
  • Each year, more than 12,500 Ontarians are celebrated through five honours and 11 recognition programs. 
  • As part of our tribute efforts, the province also marks special anniversaries such as Tribute to the Fallen, Remembrance Day, and Canada Day.

Table 3: Ministry Interim Actual Expenditures 2015-16


Ministry Interim Actual Expenditures ($M) 2015-16 *
Operating 169.4
Capital 0.0

Staff Strength  **
(as of March 31, 2015)

408.2

* Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2016 Ontario Budget.

**Ontario Public Service Full-Time Equivalent positions. Includes International Trade and Marketing portfolio and Business Immigration Branch and excludes seasonal, students and leaves of absence.