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Published Plans and Annual Report 2015-16


Table of contents

Ministry overview

Ministry contribution to priorities and results

Ministry programs and activities

Table 1: ministry planned expenditures 2015-16 ($m)

Ministry organization chart

Agencies, boards and commissions (abcs)

Detailed financial information

Appendix: 2014-15 annual report

Table 3: ministry interim actual expenditures 2014-15


Ministry overview

Mandate

The Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade (MCIIT), which serves three ministers (Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade, Minister Responsible for Women's Issues, and Minister Responsible for Seniors Affairs), has lead responsibility for immigration and newcomer settlement, international trade and marketing, voluntary and not-for-profit sector, provincial honours and awards, women’s issues, and seniors’ affairs.

The Ministry’s vision is: “A diverse and inclusive society where all people contribute to a strong economy, caring society and enhanced quality of life.”

To achieve this vision, the Ministry works in partnership with other provincial ministries, other levels of government, the public, and the private and not-for-profit sectors to develop and implement policies and programs that:

  • Maximize the benefits of immigration for newcomers and Ontario by attracting highly skilled workers to help meet Ontario’s labour market needs and supporting the successful social and economic integration of newcomers;
  • Promote and recognize greater social inclusion, civic and community engagement, and volunteerism;
  • Support the creation of jobs by promoting Ontario as a premier location to do business, and by attracting investment and increasing exports;
  • Build a society free of violence against women and increase women’s economic security;
  • Improve the quality of life for Ontario’s seniors by helping them live safely, independently and with dignity in their communities; and
  • Provide accessible, inclusive and respectful service to Ontario’s diverse communities.

Ministry contribution to priorities and results

The Ministry’s programs directly support the key government priorities of “Increased Talent and Skills Among Ontarians,” “Supportive and Dynamic Business Environment,” “Reduced Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion,” and “Strengthened Public Safety and Security” by improving the economic and social outcomes of newcomers, women and seniors, increasing the competitiveness of employers, strengthening the capacity of the not-for-profit sector, strengthening Ontario’s economy and innovation agenda, and increasing safety and security for women and seniors. 

The Ministry is organized according to the following program areas:

Immigration:

Through the implementation of the Immigration Strategy, the Ministry is supporting Ontario’s economic growth and prosperity by:  attracting highly skilled workers and their families, supporting diverse communities, and growing a globally connected economy.  The Strategy sets a new direction for how we select, welcome and help immigrants to our province.  It provides a framework to engage with partners and develop more coordinated services to better serve the changing needs of Ontario’s immigrants.

Immigration Selection Program – Selects strong economic immigrants to help meet Ontario’s labour market needs and increase economic immigration to the province and provides supports to employers and investors. The program is delivered by the Provincial Nominee Program and Business Immigration.

Labour Market Integration Program Delivers a range of workplace and foreign qualification recognition support services to help highly skilled immigrants succeed in the labour market. This includes Ontario Bridge Training Programs, Global Experience Ontario and implementation of the Fair Access to Regulated Professions and Compulsory Trades Act.

Settlement and Integration Program – Addresses key gaps in immigrant outcomes by providing access to comprehensive settlement services that help newcomers overcome integration barriers. Services are delivered through the Newcomer Settlement and Municipal Immigration Online Programs.

Language Training – Provides English and French as a Second Language training from basic to advanced levels to help learners gain the language skills they need to successfully work and live in Ontario.

Citizenship:

Citizenship programs support jobs and economic growth through partnering with the not-for-profit sector and promoting greater social inclusion, civic and community engagement, and recognition.

Ontario’s Voluntary Sector and Not-for-Profit Sector Program Strengthens and sustains the not-for-profit sector and encourages and supports volunteerism in Ontario. Both sectors provide a public benefit by advocating for the vulnerable sector.

Honours and Awards Secretariat – Delivers honours and awards programs that recognize the outstanding achievements and contributions of Ontarians for their service to the community. The Secretariat also organizes special commemorative events on behalf of the Province of Ontario.

New measurements have been developed for immigration and citizenship programs in the past fiscal year, which will be monitored and refined to ensure that measures and targets are meaningful and relevant.

International Trade:

International trade programs advance Ontario’s interests to maximize Ontario’s benefits from global investments and trade opportunities.

International Representation – Represents Ontario in key commercial centres around the world; develop export, investment, research and innovation opportunities in key sectors.

Export Development – Increases the number and value of Ontario exporters and diversifies markets by promoting the benefits of exporting and offering a continuum of services (e.g., exporter skills development seminars, international trade missions, incoming buyers sessions).

Investment Attraction – Promotes Ontario’s global brand and facilitates international investment opportunities to create jobs in Ontario (e.g., Marketing Program, International Marketing Centres).

Global Growth Fund – Increases export sales of Ontario goods and services by sharing the cost of initiatives that Ontario companies cannot undertake alone (e.g., Export Access Market Program; Ontario Exporters Fund).

Pan Am Economic Summit – Develops and leads 2015 Pan/Parapan Games Legacy and Promotion related business activities.

Ongoing performance metric tracking and client survey and export development programs are reviewed and adjusted to ensure they meet the needs and expectations of clients.  A number of new measurements have been put in place in the last fiscal year (e.g., investment transactions, trade assists), which will be reviewed and adjusted accordingly to ensure that measures and targets are meaningful. 

Women’s Issues – Ontario Women’s Directorate:

The Ontario Women’s Directorate (OWD) provides advice and support to government ministries on issues affecting women.  OWD develops policies and programs that focus on the prevention of violence against women and increasing women’s economic security.

Economic Security and Leadership – Targets vulnerable and low-income women and includes skilled trades and information technology training, microlending initiatives, employment training for abused and at-risk women, and funding for women’s centres.

Violence Against Women Prevention – Works with ministries to develop, implement and evaluate initiatives to prevent violence and improve supports to victims, including providing funds for:

  • Domestic violence and sexual violence public education campaigns to change attitudes and engage communities in identifying the signs of violence and intervening safely and effectively;
  • Province-wide training for professionals in the health, education, justice and social services sectors to improve their skills in supporting women who are experiencing violence;
  • Aboriginal women’s initiatives including leadership development, public education and training;
  • Targeted initiatives for diverse and ethno-cultural populations, such as public education and language interpreter services; and
  • Data collection on outputs and short-term outcomes of individual initiatives (e.g., professionals trained, number of communities reached). 

OWD collects quantitative data for measuring outcomes of its programs (e.g., number of women trained who get jobs or go on to further training).   The OWD will also be supporting the Ministry of Labour in developing measures for monitoring the progress on the Gender Wage Gap.

The main mechanism for measuring overall reductions in the prevalence of violence against women in the longer term is Statistics Canada’s General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization. 

Seniors’ Affairs - Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat:

The Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat (OSS) develops policies and delivers programs to meet the needs of seniors to help them lead active, healthy and dignified lives and undertakes public education efforts for and about Ontario seniors. 

Seniors Friendly Communities – Oversee Elderly Persons Centres (EPCs) which provide social and recreation programs for seniors and administer the Elderly Persons Centres Act; provide Seniors Community Grants to not-for-profit community groups for projects to encourage greater social inclusion and volunteerism; promote Age-Friendly Communities; provide information through public education to support healthy aging; recognize seniors’ contributions; and improve access to information about programs and services available to seniors, including through Active Living Fairs, Seniors’ Month (June) activities and a range of print and online resources. 

Safety and Security – Implementing the Retirement Homes Act, 2010 and overseeing the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority; ongoing delivery and renewal of Ontario’s elder abuse strategy; and ongoing implementation of the Finding Your Way Wandering Prevention Program.

OSS is working closely with program delivery partners to develop meaningful performance measures for these programs and initiatives – many of which are new or are being refreshed – to demonstrate how they contribute to Ministry and government priorities and outcomes. 

Ministry Programs

The tables below illustrate the Ministry’s key program commitments and expected results for 2015-16 that align with key government priorities.

“Increased Talent and Skills Among Ontarians”

MCIIT’s Key Commitments for 2015-16

  • Developing strategies to improve and streamline the Foreign Qualification Recognition process in Ontario by working in partnership with the federal government, other provinces, other ministries, regulatory bodies and key stakeholders.
  • Delivering Ontario’s Bridge Training programs to help skilled immigrants get licensed or find employment at a level commensurate with skills and experience.
  • Delivering the Adult Non-Credit ESL/FSL Program to help approximately 70,000 learners each year acquire the language skills they need to live in Ontario and succeed in the labour market.
  • Continuing, through Global Experience Ontario, to develop tools to assist pre and post-arrival internationally-trained individuals so that they have accurate information about working in non-health regulated professions and in the trades.

Expected Results

  • Immigrants find employment commensurate with their skills and experience which contributes to decreased unemployment rates of recent and very recent immigrants compared to that of Canadian-born.
  • Improved acquisition of official language skills.
  • Immigrants can access qualification recognition pathways.

“Supportive and Dynamic Business Environment”

MCIIT’s Key Commitments for 2015-16

  • Attracting a highly skilled workforce and build a stronger economy by:
    • Transforming Ontario’s Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) which selects strong economic immigrants (i.e., eligible foreign workers, international students and foreign investors) with potential to contribute to Ontario’s economy. In 2015, the PNP has a nomination target of 5,200, which includes nominations made through the federal Express Entry system.
    • Supporting the legislative process concerning Bill 49, the Ontario Immigration Act, which if passed, would put into place the regulatory authority and tools to welcome immigrants that will help Ontario meet its future labour market needs.
    • Continuing to work toward the target of 5% francophone immigration set out in Ontario’s Immigration Strategy.
    • Continuing to work toward a target of 70% economic immigrants to Ontario.
    • Utilizing the Minister’s Employers’ Table to gather information that will help Ontario better support employer immigration needs and identify opportunities to improve the labour market integration of Ontario’s immigrants.
    • Collaborating with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities and other ministries to enhance labour market data to help inform priority setting for immigration selection and program planning.
    • Continuing to work with federal, provincial and territorial governments as provincial co-chair of the Forum of Ministers Responsible for Immigration to build a strong multilateral partnership and advance common immigration objectives.
    • Delivering the Ontario Talent Business Advantage Program to support the high-skilled talent needs of Ontario companies and investments.
  • Leveraging the global connections of our diverse communities by:
    • Developing a Global Connections Strategy to leverage Ontario’s diversity to ensure better international trade and investment opportunities.
  • Strengthening Ontario’s Global Footprint through Ontario’s international representatives, which act as business ambassadors for the Province, to project Ontario on the world stage, provide expertise and connections to facilitate new economic partnerships, and contribute to the Province’s trade and investment by:
    • Operating Ontario’s 11 high profile international offices;
    • Administering the economic partnerships established with other jurisdictions; and
    • Organizing/supporting Premier’s and Minister’s international missions as well as Ontario business delegations to global markets.
  • Working with Ontario exporters and international buyers to increase Ontario’s export of goods and services, MCIIT is a key provincial resource for global trade promotion, liaising with many other stakeholders within (and outside of) the Ontario government, and leads by example across many industrial sectors and geographical markets. This involves:
    • Raising awareness of export market opportunities;
    • Encouraging them to expand into new and emerging high growth markets;
    • Acting as a catalyst to connect Ontario companies with opportunities in foreign markets though on-the-ground assistance of the international offices and International Trade Development Representatives (ITDR) firms in target markets; and
    • Increasing the international awareness of Ontario’s quality goods and services.
    • Organizing incoming buyer programs and incoming delegations to Ontario, with business-to-business matchmaking with Ontario suppliers.
  • Developing Ontario’s first Volunteer Strategy to promote volunteerism and civic engagement in the Province, and support a dynamic business environment in the not-for-profit sector.
  • Supporting the Not-for-Profit (NFP) sector through:
    • Partnership Grant Program (PGP).
    • NFP online channel (ServiceOntario for NFPs).
    • Invigorate Ontario’s tradition of volunteering.
    • Open for Business initiative to streamline government processes.
  • Partnering with the NFP sector through the Strategic Partnership Initiatives program to:
    • Undertake research about the Not-for-Profit sector.
    • Promote the value of active citizenship and volunteering through the ChangeTheWorld program.
    • Implement the Ontario Volunteer Legacy Initiative of the 2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games to encourage volunteerism during the Games and beyond. Through this initiative, volunteers will receive a certificate that recognizes their skills and experience and Ontario volunteers will have access to a first-stop gateway for Ontarians looking for volunteer opportunities.

Expected Results

  • Ontario employers are more competitive as a result of the nomination of economic immigrants with high levels of human capital.
  • Increased awareness of immigration and export support services among immigrant entrepreneurs.
  • Enhanced global awareness of the Ontario brand, to generate investment and export leads.
  • Establishment of new International Marketing Centres.
  • Enhanced business development opportunities through Pan/Am Games related business events.
  • Enhanced collaboration with ethnic and cultural chambers, business councils, business and cultural leaders, and experienced exporters.
  • Increased export activity by Ontario’s SMEs due to domestic marketing campaigns.
  • A stronger, more effective and responsive partnership between the government of Ontario and the not-for-profit and voluntary sector.

“Reduced Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion”

MCIIT’s Key Commitments for 2015-16

  • Continuing to invest in programs and services that support the integration of newcomers through the following programs:
    • Newcomer Settlement Program: Provides access to community-based settlement and integration services to more than 80,000 newcomers each year through a network of 95 community agencies.
    • Ontario’s Youth Action Plan: working with MCYS, the Ministry will develop targeted services to improve outcomes for at-risk and vulnerable newcomer youth.
    • Language Interpreter Services Program: Provides interpreter services to help more than 7,000 victims of domestic violence, sexual violence and human trafficking who do not speak English or French or are deaf or hard of hearing to access social, legal and healthcare services.
  • Connecting immigrants and employers through the Municipal Immigration Information Online Program (MIIO), and providing municipalities the opportunity to showcase their communities as a destination by providing local information through municipal portals.
  • Promoting women’s economic security by supporting:
    • Training programs for low-income women to enter into higher paying jobs.
    • Micro-lending programs to help low-income women start their own business/self-employment.
    • Initiatives to promote women’s leadership.
  • Promoting seniors’ engagement, inclusion, and active and healthy aging by:
    • Supporting and overseeing Elderly Persons Centres (EPCs), including conducting a review of the EPC program; delivering the Seniors Community Grant Program; and supporting Age-Friendly Communities (AFC) through initiatives such as the AFC Planning Grant Program.
    • Developing and providing critical and timely information for diverse seniors through Active Living Fairs, Seniors’ Month activities and a range of resources (e.g., “A Guide to Programs and Services for Seniors in Ontario,” available in print and online in multiple languages; Seniors INFOline).

Expected Results

  • Improved settlement and integration outcomes: reduction in poverty rates, improved social integration and labour market performance.
  • Improved access to community services through the provision of interpreter services to victims of domestic and sexual violence who have language barriers.
  • Increased participation of women in the economic life of Ontario, including participation in non-traditional professions and in leadership positions.
  • Seniors’ policy issues identified and advanced through initiatives that help improve the quality of life of Ontario’s seniors.
  • Healthy and active aging and seniors’ inclusion and community engagement promoted and supported, through increased opportunities for seniors’ engagement, volunteerism, and learning.

“Strengthened Public Safety and Security”

MCIIT’s Key Commitments for 2015-16

  • Promoting seniors’ safety and security by:
    • Overseeing the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority, and policy, legislative and regulatory development related to the Retirement Homes Act, 2010, including a five-year statutory review.
    • Continuing to deliver, and reviewing, Ontario’s Strategy to Combat Elder Abuse.
    • Supporting and overseeing the Finding Your Way Wandering Prevention Program.
  • Promoting women’s safety by:
    • Implementing a wide range of new initiatives under the government’s new Action Plan to Stop Sexual Violence and Harassment.
    • Supporting public education campaigns and training of professionals to address all forms of gendered violence.
    • Forming a Roundtable to provide ongoing advice to the Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues on issues related to violence against women.
    • Co-leading a Joint Working Group that is developing and implementing initiatives to address the high rates of violence against Aboriginal women.

Expected Results

  • Enhanced safety and security for vulnerable seniors.
  • More effective supports for women who are victims of violence, including supports targeting diverse communities, disabilities and linguistic needs.
  • Safer workplaces and campuses that are more responsive to complaints about sexual violence and harassment.
  • Engagement of a broad spectrum of partners in the prevention of violence against women through the delivery and impact of public education campaigns, including those aimed at diverse communities.

Other Priorities

MCIIT’s Key Commitments for 2015-16

  • Recognize the contributions Ontarians make to their communities and to the Province.
  • Lead a cross-government plan to mark the 150th anniversary of Canada’s Constitution Act.
Expected Results
  • A strong civic society in which volunteers are acknowledged for their service to the community.
  • Coordinated cross-government activities to commemorate Canada’s 150th anniversary.

Table 1:  Ministry Planned Expenditures 2015-16 ($M)

Operating 158.6
Capital 0.0
TOTAL 158.6

Highlights of 2014-15 achievements

MCIIT continued to deliver results that support the government’s key priorities.  Highlights of these results include:

  • Supporting the legislative process concerning the Ontario Immigration Act (Bill 49), which would, if passed, formally recognize the important role of immigration and support the expansion of Ontario’s Provincial Nominee Program to help meet the Province’s future labour market needs;
  • Leading the Premier-led mission to China that generated significant business results;
  • Launching It’s Never Okay: An Action Plan to Stop Sexual Violence and Harassment; and
  • Continuing to support Ontario’s Action Plan for Seniors. 

Ministry Organization Chart

1. Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade

1.1 Minister Responsible for Seniors' Affairs - Mario Sergio

1.2 Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade - Michael Chan

1.2.1 Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade - Cristina Martins

1.2.2 Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade - Monte Kwinter

1.3 Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues - Tracy MacCharles

1.3.1 Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues - Harinder Malhi

2.1 Deputy Minister - Helen Angus

2.1.1 Executive Assistant to Deputy Minister - Sam Bleiweiss

3.1 Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat and Ontario Women’s DirectorateAssistant Deputy Minister - Juanita Dobson

3.1.1 Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat Strategic Policy and Stakeholder Relations BranchDirector - Abby Katz Starr

3.1.2 Ontario Women’s Directorate Executive Director - Susan Seaby

3.2 Regional and Corporate Services Division CAO/Assistant Deputy Minister - Cindy Lam

3.2.1 Human Resources Branch Director - Liborio Campisi

3.2.2 Legal Services Branch Director- Fateh Salim

3.2.3 Corporate Resources Branch Director - Tony Marzotto

3.2.4 Regional Services Branch Director - Tom Chrzan

3.2.5 Corporate Policy Unit Manager - Rod Browning

3.3 Citizenship and Immigration Division Assistant Deputy Minister - Marsha Barnes

3.3.1 Citizenship Branch Director - Rick Beaver

3.3.2 Immigration Policy Branch Director - Alice Young

3.3.3 Immigration Programs Branch Director - Yvonne Ferrer(A)

3.3.4 Immigration Selection Branch Director - Doug Dixon(A)

3.3.5 Projects Director - Nanda Casucci Byrne

3.3.6 Provincial/Territorial Secretariat Director - Stephanie Shatilla

3.3.7 Business Immigration Branch Director - Doug Dixon(A)

3.4 International Trade and Representation Division Assistant Deputy Minister - Cameron Sinclair

3.4.1 International Representation Branch Director - Dave Barnes(A)

3.4.2 International Trade Director - Enrico Di Nino(A)

3.4.3 Marketing and Missions Branch Director - Margaret Steeves

3.4.4 2015 Pan Am Games Special Projects Director - Dino Rocca

3.5 Agency Transformation Assistant Deputy Minister - Mary Shenstone

3.6 Communications Branch Director - Deborah Swain

3.7 Community Services I&IT Cluster CIO/Assistant Deputy Minister - Soussan Tabari

3.7.1 Case and Grant Management Solutions Director - Sanaul Haque

3.7.2 Data Collection and Decision Support Solutions Director - Carm Scarfo(A)

3.7.3 iACCESS Solutions Director - Sanjay Madan

3.7.4 Strategic Planning and Relationship Management Director - Lolita Singh

Dual Reporting Relationships:

Cindy Lam - Administratively reports to Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade. Provides services to Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade, Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport and Pan/Parapan American Games Secretariat.

Liborio Campisi - Reports to CAO/ADM, Regional and Corporate Services Division, Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and ADM, HR Service Delivery, Ministry of Government and Consumer Services

Fateh Salim - Reports to CAO/ADM, Regional and Corporate Services Division, Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and Assistant Deputy Attorney General, Ministry of the Attorney General

Deborah Swain - Reports to DM, Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and Associate Secretary of Cabinet and DM, Corporate Communications

Soussan Tabari - Reports to Corporate Chief Information Technology Officer

(A) Denotes “Acting”

Agencies, Boards and Commissions (ABCs)

Advisory Council to the Order of Ontario:

The Order of Ontario is the province’s highest official honour.  An independent Advisory Council recommends individuals to receive this honour in recognition of their excellence and achievement in Ontario and around the world.

Office of the Fairness Commissioner (OFC):

The OFC is responsible for assessing the registration practices of regulated professions.  Its purpose is to make sure these practices are transparent, objective, impartial and fair for anyone applying to practice his or her profession, particularly for internationally trained individuals. 

Ontario Investment and Trade Advisory Council (OITAC):

OITAC was established to provide strategic advice and support to the government on promoting Ontario to the world as a premier location for business investment and immigration, and helping Ontario firms to begin exporting to new markets or to expand their exports to existing markets.

Ontario Immigration Investor Corporation (OIIC):

OIIC was established in 1999 to invest the funds received under the federal Immigrant Investor Program (IIP) to support economic development and job creation. The primary obligation of the OIIC is to invest the money from immigrant investors and to return the investment in five years. The program was created to provide permanent residency to individuals who meet eligibility criteria and invest $800,000 for a period of five years which is distributed to participating provinces and territories. The IIP was terminated by the federal government in April 2014; as a result, the OIIC will wind-down when its repayment obligations are satisfied in 2020.

Ontario Medal for Young Volunteers Advisory Council:

An independent Advisory Council recommends youth, between the ages of 15 and 24, to receive the Ontario Medal for Young Volunteers in recognition of their outstanding volunteer achievements.

Province of Ontario Medal for Firefighters Bravery Advisory Council:

An independent Advisory Council recommends firefighters to receive the Ontario Medal for Firefighter Bravery in recognition of their acts of outstanding courage and bravery while on or off duty.    

Province of Ontario Medal for Police Bravery Advisory Council:

An independent Advisory Council recommends police officers to receive the Ontario Medal for Police Bravery in recognition of their acts of outstanding courage and bravery while on or off duty. 

Province of Ontario Medal for Good Citizenship Advisory Council:

An independent Advisory Council recommends individuals to receive the Ontario Medal of Good Citizenship in recognition of their outstanding long-term efforts and contributions to the well-being of their communities.

As part of the Honours Advisory mandate review, it was recommended that four advisory councils (Ontario Medal for Young Volunteers; Province of Ontario Medal for Firefighters Bravery; Province of Ontario Medal for Police Bravery; and Province of Ontario Medal for Good Citizenship) be dissolved and a new agency be created to take their place.  The Ministry is currently taking steps to accomplish that goal.

REGULATORY AUTHORITY

The Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade oversees the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority (RHRA), a regulatory authority created by the Retirement Homes Act, 2010 to administer and enforce the Act and its regulations on behalf of the government.  The Act provides a framework for the regulation of retirement homes, establishes an accountability and governance framework for the regulation of retirement homes, and establishes an accountability and governance framework between the Ministry and the RHRA. 

The RHRA is responsible for licensing retirement homes, education of licensees, and conducting inspections, investigations and enforcement activities.  It also handles consumer complaints about retirement homes, provides consumers with information about retirement homes, and maintains a public register of retirement homes. 

Summary of ABCs' financial Data

Name 2015-16 Expense Estimates 2015-16 Revenue Expense Estimates 2014-15 Expense Estimates Interim Actuals 2014-15 Revenue Interim Actuals 2013-14 Expense Estimates Actuals 2013-14 Revenue Actuals

Office of the Fairness Commissioner

1,795,000 - 1,720,088 - 1,466,900 -

Ontario Immigrant Investor Corporation

10,252,000 17,246,900 14,166,000 25,901,000 16,866,000 29,809,000

Ontario Investment and Trade Advisory Council

N/A - N/A - N/A -

Order of Ontario Advisory Council

N/A - N/A - N/A -

Province of Ontario Medal - Fire Fighters Bravery Advisory Council

N/A - N/A - N/A -

Province of Ontario - Good Citizenship Advisory Council

N/A - N/A - N/A -

Province of Ontario - Police Bravery Advisory Council

N/A - N/A - N/A -
Province of Ontario Medal - Young Volunteers Advisory Council N/A - N/A - N/A -

Detailed financial information

Table 2: Combined Operating and Capital Summary by Vote

Votes/Programs Estimates
2015-16
$
Change from
Estimates 2014-15
$
% Estimates
2014-15*
$
Interim Actuals
2014-15*
$
Actuals
2013-14*
$

Operating expense

Ministry administration program* 24,706,200 186,600 0.8 24,519,600 25,816,678 25,287,473
Citizenship and Immigration Program 126,090,900 4,150,600 3.4 121,940,300 123,423,361 121,615,152
Ontario women's directorate 20,501,300 2,145,100 11.7 18,356,200 20,311,287 17,992,461
Ontario seniors' secretariat 18,894,500 1,200,000 6.8 17,694,500 17,771,582 16,403,466
International trade 20,209,500 - - 20,209,500 16,700,400 16,398,839
Less: special warrants - (29,161,000) (100.0) 29,161,000 - -
Total operating expense to be voted 210,402,400 36,843,300 21.2 173,559,100 204,023,308 197,697,391
Special warrants - (29,161,000) (100.0) 29,161,000 - -
Statutory appropriations 128,028 - - 128,028 129,428 58,653
Ministry total operating expense 210,530,428 7,682,300 3.8 202,848,128 204,152,736 197,756,044
Consolidation & other adjustments - school boards (55,718,000) 2,325,500 - (58,043,500) (54,488,000) (53,630,775)
Consolidation & other adjustments - colleges (4,728,600) (2,073,700) - (2,654,900) (5,784,100) (6,878,473)
Consolidation & other adjustments - Ontario immigrant investment corporation 8,467,400 (1,027,000) (10.8) 9,494,400 12,019,600 14,599,093
Total including consolidation & other adjustments 158,551,228 6,907,100 4.6 151,644,128 155,900,236 151,845,889

Capital expense

Ministry administration program 1,000 - - 1,000 - -
Regional services program   - - 1,000 - -
Total Capital Expense to be Voted 1,000 - - 2,000 - -
Statutory appropriations 1,000 (1,000) (50.0) 2,000 - -
Ministry total capital expense 2,000 (2,000) (50.0) 4,000 - -

Capital assets

Ministry administration program 1,000 - - 1,000 - -
Regional services program - (1,000) (100.0) 1,000 - -
Ministry total capital assets 1,000 (1,000) (50.0) 2,000 - -
Ministry Total Operating and Capital Including Consolidation and Other Adjustments (not including Assets) 158,553,228 6,905,100 4.6 151,648,128 155,900,236 151,845,889

*Also provides support to the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport including the Pan/Parapan American Games Secretariat.

**Estimates, Interim Actuals and Actuals for prior fiscal years are re-stated to reflect any changes in ministry organization and/or program structure. Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2015 Ontario Budget.

Appendix: 2014-15 annual report

2014-15 achievements

The tables below illustrate the Ministry’s key strategies and results for the 2014-15 fiscal year.

Increased Talent and Skills Among Ontarians

Key Commitments Results Achieved
Implement initiatives to help highly skilled immigrants succeed in the labour market.
  • Invested $26.4M, including $5.2M in federal funding, in Ontario Bridge Training Programs to help highly-skilled immigrants get licensed or find employment that matches their skills and experience.
  • Continued to lead Ontario’s participation in the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications to ensure that immigrants have the opportunity to fully utilize their skills within the Ontario labour market as quickly as possible.
  • Continued to work with the Office of the Fairness Commissioner through the Fair Access to Regulated Professions and Compulsory Trades Act (FARPACTA) to ensure that licensure, registration and certification practices are objective, fair, impartial and transparent.
  • Launched delivery of pre-arrival services through webinars on licensure, registration and certification processes in Ontario’s non-health regulated professions and the trades, reaching over 480 prospective immigrants in Asia,Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America. 
Implement skilled trades training, employment training, and microlending programs to promote women’s economic security, including access to better paying jobs. 
  • Invested more than $2.1M in the Women in Skilled Trades and Information Technology (WIST/IT) training program. Since 2003, more than 2,350 women have participated in the program.
  • More than 1400 low-income women are participating in training through the Microlending for Women in Ontario program.  In the last year, the Ministry invested more than $300,000 in the Program.
Work with partner ministries in the development of policies and programs that support newcomers’ economic and social integration.
  • Worked collaboratively with other ministries on the following key initiatives:
    • Employment and Training Services Integration: Collaborated with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities and other affected ministries to ensure that the unique needs of newcomers are addressed.
    • Ontario Adult Education Strategy: Continued collaboration with the Ministries of Education and Training, Colleges and Universities to ensure that adult learners have effective pathways to the integrated employment and training system.
    • Ontario Youth Action Plan: Collaborated with the Ministry of Children and Youth Services to respond to the needs of at-risk newcomer youth through the development of phase 2 of the government’s youth action plan.
Conduct a review of the gaps and opportunities in Foreign Qualification Recognition for regulated and non-regulated professions in Ontario.
  • Conducted a third party review of Foreign Qualification Recognition in Ontario. The results of the review will help identify best practices, gaps and strategies for improving the FQR process in Ontario.
Ensure immigrants have the opportunity to fully utilize their skills within the Ontario labour market as quickly as possible by supporting the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications and Fair Access to Regulated Professions and Compulsory Trades Act (FARPACTA).
  • Continued to participate on ongoing pan-Canadian efforts to improve foreign qualification recognition, including co-chairing a working group and conducting research into topics such as alternative careers and pre-arrival supports.

Enhance the Adult Non-Credit Language Training ESL/FSL program to help newcomers acquire the language skills they need to integrate socially and economically. 

  • Invested $56M in language training through the Adult Non-Credit ESL/FSL program to help learners acquire official language skills.
  • Implemented initiatives to enhance the delivery of language training:
    • Introduced a Language Training Certificate to confirm proficiency levels of enrolled learners.
    • Began implementation the Portfolio-Based Language Assessment framework to improve tracking of learner outcomes. 
    • Continued collaboration with the federal government to improve service coordination and reduce overlap.  

Supportive and Dynamic Business Environment

Key Commitments Results Achieved

Implement initiatives as part of Ontario’s Immigration Strategy, which aim to:

  • Attract a skilled workforce and grow a stronger economy.
  • Pursued an expanded role in immigrant selection to help meet Ontario’s labour market needs. Ontario’s Provincial Nominee Program was expanded from 1,300 nominations in 2013 to 2,500 in 2014 and met the province’s new nomination target in 2014.  The Ministry met the nomination target of 2500 in 2014.
  • Re-introduced the Ontario Immigration Act (Bill 49), which would, if passed, recognize the important role that immigration has played in the history and development of Ontario and put in place the regulatory authority and tools to help Ontario expand its immigrant selection program.
  • Introduced a series of measures in response to the recommendations of the Auditor General’s Value for Money Audit of Ontario’s Provincial Nominee Program to enhance the integrity and administration of the program.
Continue to work toward a target of 5% francophone immigration to Ontario. 
  • Continued to collaborate with the federal government and stakeholders to explore opportunities to increase francophone immigration and improve access to services for francophone newcomers.  
  • Participated in Destination Canada events in Paris and Brussels to attract and market Ontario to prospective francophone immigrants. 
  • Increased program access to allow adult immigrants whose first language is French to access tuition-free language training as part of the Adult Non-Credit ESL/FSL Program.
  • Launched a francophone municipal immigration website through Municipal Immigration Information Online program to help Ontario municipalities provide local information and promote themselves to francophone immigrants. 
  • Enhanced access to community-based settlement supports for francophone immigrants through the Newcomer Settlement Program.
Continue to implement the Minister’s Employers’ Table to better support employer immigration needs and explore ways to improve labour market outcomes for Ontario’s immigrants.
  • Held the second round of the Minister’s Employers Tables.  Over 260 employers were consulted through the Minister’s Employers Tables to identify ways to better respond to their workforce development needs through immigration selection. 

Attract, expand, and retain high-value, quality investment.

Support Ontario businesses export to or expand into new markets. 
  • Recent Premier-led mission to China have generated significant business results - 2014 mission concluded with 26 agreements being signed, including investment announcements totalling $966M and the creation of 1,800 jobs across the province. 
  • Ontario exporters assisted through export programs reported $420.1M  in export sales opportunities
  • The International Marketing Centres assisted more than 574 companies to access export markets, facilitated 38 trade transactions totalling more than $30.6 million of projected sales, and contributed to 15 won investment deals representing 172 jobs secured and more than $64.5 million invested in Ontario.
  • The International Trade Development Representatives (ITDRs) covering the Gulf Corporation Council, Southeast Asia, Mexico, Chile and Brazil together assisted 475 Ontario exporters.  They identified and transferred 168 qualified leads to the Trade Branch, and together with the Branch team facilitated 38 export contracts. 

Continue to implement recommendations from the Partnership Project report for the government to be more responsive, supportive and accessible to not-for-profit (NFP) organizations. Initiatives include:

  • Partnership Grant Program (PGP)
  • NFP online channel (ServiceOntario for NFPs)
  • Open For Business initiative to streamline government processes
  • Re-designed and launched the 2014 Partnership Grant Program, which will invest over $8M over three years, to build capacity in the NFP sector in three priority areas - Program Evaluation, Inclusive Leadership, Volunteer Management.
  • Launched an online channel for NFPs on ServiceOntario.ca that will provide easy access to information on government funding, as well as legal and regulatory information and resources for NFP organizations.
  • Collaborated with other ministries and the government’s Open for Business strategy to reduce the administrative burden on NFP organizations and streamline transfer payment processes. 

Partner with the NFP sector through the Strategic Partnership Initiatives program by:

  • Releasing research on the not-for-profit sector.
  • Promoting greater awareness of the value of active citizenship and volunteering.
  • Supporting the Ontario Volunteer Legacy Initiatives of the 2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games to encourage volunteerism during the Games and beyond.
  • Released a research report, State of the Sector Profile of Ontario Not-for-Profit and Charitable Organizations, which documents the socio-economic contribution of the not-for-profit sector in Ontario. 
  • Supported initiatives that promote volunteerism in Ontario.
    • ChangeTheWorld: Ontario Youth Volunteer Challenge engages 14- to 18-year-olds each year in community volunteering events. In 2014, almost 40,000 youth participated in 735 events across the province where they donated almost 210,000 volunteer hours.
    • DiverseCity: The Greater Toronto Leadership Project is helping to change the face of volunteer leadership within the Greater Toronto Area to better reflect the diversity of the region, and to capitalize on skills, experiences, and commitment.
  • Initiated implementation of the Ontario Volunteer Legacy initiatives of the 2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games to encourage volunteerism at the Games.

Reduced Poverty, Inequality and Exclusion

Key Commitments Results Achieved

Help newcomers and their families achieve success.

Leverage the global connections of our diverse communities.
  • Invested $8.9M in the Newcomer Settlement Program to provide settlement services to approximately 80,000 newcomers and targeted services for vulnerable immigrant groups such as refugees, foreign workers and at-risk youth.
  • Implemented “International Student Connect”, a pilot program to facilitate retention and integration of international students.
  • Supported the development of 28 municipal immigration websites, through the Municipal Immigration Information Online program, to attract immigrants and investment to local communities, and launched the Municipal Innovation Fund.
Support broader gender diversity on the boards and in senior management of major businesses, not-for-profit firms and other large organizations.
  • The Ministry worked with the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) to introduce “comply or explain” amendments.  Companies listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) are now required to report publicly on their approach to increase the number of women on their boards. 

Promote safe, active and healthy aging by:

  • Coordinating and implementing initiatives under Ontario’s Action Plan for Seniors.
  • Delivering and Overseeing the Seniors Community Grant Program.
  • Supporting Age Friendly Communities (AFC) by sharing the AFC Planning Guide and developing the new AFC grant and recognition programs.
  • Developing and sharing critical and timely information to diverse seniors communities and helping to enhance one-stop accessing government programs.
  • Providing oversight/delivery of the Elderly Persons Centres (EPC) network.
  • Delivering Active Living Fairs across the province.
  • Continued to support Ontario’s Action Plan for Seniors by:
    • Launching the AFC Planning Grant program, which will offer a total of up to $1.5M over two years (2015-16 and 2016-17) for short- and longer-term projects;
    • Partnering with the University of Waterloo, Ontario Interdisciplinary Council for Aging and Health, and Seniors Health Knowledge Network to support outreach to communities engaging in AFC activities;
    • Releasing a new edition of “A Guide to Programs and Services for Seniors in Ontario,” available in print and online in multiple languages;
    • Funding, through the Seniors Community Grant Program, 179 projects affecting 43,000 seniors across the province; and
    • Approving a total of $11.5M for 265 Elderly Persons Centres and initiating a program review.
  • Since 2006, Active Living Fairs have been delivered across the province to educate seniors on healthy aging, active lifestyles, and community resources available to them.  In 2014-15, 60 Active Living Fairs were held across the province – double the number of fairs in 2012-13.   
Support training programs that strengthen the leadership skills of Aboriginal women.
  • Over 6,000 Aboriginal women have participated in OWD funded leadership development workshops since 2007 and about 300 of them have taken on leadership roles in their communities.
Champion Ontario’s issues on the intergovernmental stage and liaising with major senior groups to provide a forum for the exchange of information.
  • Ontario participates in annual meetings of Federal-Provincial-Territorial (F/P/T) Ministers Responsible for Seniors to discuss opportunities and challenges posed by an aging population, and to undertake collaborative work to enhance quality of life for seniors in Canada.

Promote seniors’ safety and security by:

  • Overseeing the Retirement Homes Act, 2010, including a 5 year statutory review, and the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority.
  • Renewing Ontario’s Strategy to Combat Elder Abuse.
  • Supporting and overseeing the Finding Your Way Wandering Prevention Program.
  • Further protections for seniors, under the Retirement Homes Act, have come into force in January 2014.  These include all corresponding regulations, including requirements for mandatory insurance and a formal process for complaints handling by the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority. 
  • The RHRA has conducted over 1,500 inspections of retirement homes responding to reports of abuse and neglect, evaluating licensing suitability and checking for compliance. 
  • In April 2015, RHRA completed a first full round of inspections for compliance with key care and safety standards.
  • Provided annual funding ($900,000 in 2014-15) to support the three priorities of Ontario’s Strategy to Combat Elder Abuse: coordination of community services, training for front-line staff, and public education to raise awareness. OSS also provided funding in 2014-15 for the collection of new Ontario data on elder abuse prevalence, which will be used to improve knowledge among seniors and service providers on how to prevent abuse and find help. 
  • The Finding Your Way Wandering Prevention Program, developed and delivered in partnership with the Alzheimer Society of Ontario, raises awareness of risks for people with dementia who may wander and go missing.  OSS has invested over $2 million in funding to date. Through the program, resources have been made available in 12 languages, including four added in 2014-15.

Implement a wide range of innovative initiatives that support the government’s Domestic Violence and Sexual Violence Action Plans and the Strategic Framework to End Violence Against Aboriginal Women, including:

  • Providing training and resources to service providers in the health, education, justice and social service sectors to improve their skills in identifying and supporting women experiencing violence; and
  • Implementing public education campaigns to change attitudes and mobilize communities to intervene early and stop violence before it happens.
  • Ontario released, It’s Never Okay: An Action Plan to Stop Sexual Violence and Harassment on March 6, 2015 before International Women’s Day.  The Action Plan includes a package of initiatives to raise awareness of sexual violence and harassment, enhance prevention initiatives to combat sexual discrimination, harassment and violence, and improve supports for victims.
  • Since 2004, over 37,000 front line professionals and service providers have been trained to detect domestic and sexual violence and support victims. 
  • Over 200 Ontario communities have engaged in the Neighbours, Friends and Family campaign.
  • Supported the expansion of the Language Interpreter Services program to help women who have experienced sexual assault or human trafficking access health care, legal and social services in over 70 languages.
  • Support the Family Law Education for Women (FLEW) campaign to help newcomer and vulnerable women understand their rights and options under family law and how to exercise them. These materials are available province-wide in 14 languages, including accessible formats.
  • Invested in sexual violence and domestic violence public education campaigns targeting diverse communities and men and boys such as:
    • Draw the Line
    • It Starts with You, It Stays with Him
    • Neighbour, Friends and Families
  • Continued to convene the Joint Working Group on Violence Against Aboriginal Women.
  • Invested in public education campaigns and training programs led by Aboriginal organizations such as:
    • Kanawayhitown.
    • Kizhaay Anashinaabe Niin: I Am a Kind Man.
    • The Building Aboriginal Women’s Leadership Program. 
  • Provided funding to support Aboriginal organizations to develop a more coordinated response to sexual violence against Aboriginal women, and for training of front-line workers to improve their skills in providing culturally appropriate services to victims. 
Recognize the contributions Ontarians make to their communities and the province.
  • Implemented several honours and awards programs that recognize and celebrate the contributions and achievements of outstanding Ontarians for their service to the community.
  • Ontario recognized more than 11,000 Ontarians for their volunteer contributions at Volunteer Service Awards ceremonies in 39 communities across the province.   

 

Table 3: Ministry Interim Actual Expenditures 2014-15


Ministry Interim Actual Expenditures ($M) 2014-15 *
Operating 155.9
Capital 0.0

Staff Strength  **
(as of March 31, 2015)

399.26

* Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2015 Ontario Budget.

**Ontario Public Service Full-Time Equivalent positions. Includes International Trade and Marketing portfolio and Business Immigration Branch and excludes seasonal, students and leaves of absence.